Will yellow fever be next in line?

Outbreaks of yellow fever has been reported in rural areas in Brazil, these outbreaks started in December 2016 and the closeness of the outbreaks to urban areas has raised concerns. Yellow fever is transmitted by the same mosquito that transmits Zika and dengue; experts indicate that yellow fever may spread with the same speed as Zika through the tropical and subtropical regions.

For more information, click on the following link:

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/03/on-the-heels-of-zika-comes-its-deadlier-relative-yellow-fever-experts-warn/

Zika is still a threat

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning travelers, including student ready for their spring break to remember that the Zika virus is still a threat. Travel alerts include countries such as Mexico, Dominican Republic and all of central and south America; also regions of Florida, Texas and all of Puerto Rico.

For more information, click on the following link:

http://lancasteronline.com/news/pennsylvania/zika-is-still-a-threat-pennsylvania-officials-remind-travelers/article_832b111e-069c-11e7-aee1-23c1d41ff635.html

CDC reveals that Zika virus continue growing in infant brains

Researchers found evidence that the Zika virus may continue to replicate inside infants brains several months after birth. The persistance of the virus in the infants brain tissue may explain how Zika can cause severe fetal birth defects long after the mothers’ infection.

For more information click on the following link:

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2016/12/13/zika-virus-can-keep-growing-in-infant-brains-even-after-birth-cdc-reports.html