The adaptation of the mosquito that carries Zika and Dengue

What makes Zika so hard to control is the mosquito that carries it. After many centuries of living in proximity to people, Aedes aegypti mosquitoes have adapted. They hide in closets and under tables and in foliage — places where spraying often doesn’t reach. Especially in an area with high-rise buildings, like Miami Beach, aerial spraying is not considered effective for A. aegypti. For that reason, federal and state health officials initially ruled it out. But as Zika cases multiplied, they decided to try a targeted spraying campaign. Philip Stoddard is the mayor of South Miami. He’s also a biologist at Florida International University. He used the county’s data to do a statistical analysis of the aerial Naled spraying.

Attached is the link for more information of this news:

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/26/499470238/zika-may-be-here-to-stay-say-u-s-health-officials

The mosquito that carries Zika is extremely difficult to eliminate.

According to Tom Frieden, the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, delivered what he called the “plain truth” about Zika and the mosquitoes that carry it. “Zika and other diseases spread by Aedes aegypti,” he said, “are really not controllable with current technologies.”

Attached is the link for more information on this news:

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/10/26/499470238/zika-may-be-here-to-stay-say-u-s-health-officials

The rapid spread of Zika and the global response

So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand an organism that the director of the Centers for Disease Control’s division of vector-borne diseases called “the most complicated issue CDC has ever faced.”

Attached the link for more information of this news:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/zikas-rapid-rise-and-the-limp-global-response-reveals-dire-global-health-challenges_us_581b6925e4b07cfea321a03f

Miami-Dade Zika spending, details and response

It took a dozen boxes of documents and a six-page letter for Miami-Dade officials to respond Friday to a request from Florida State Surgeon General Celeste Philip for more information on the county’s spending, surveillance data and future plans for combating the mosquito-borne spread of Zika in South Florida.

Attached is the link for more information on this news:

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/health-care/article112649393.html